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Bosie Ball


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Bosie Ball


In the game of cricket, a googly refers to a type of delivery bowled by a right-arm leg spin bowler. It is different from the normal delivery for a leg-spin bowler in that it is turning the other way. The googly is not a variation of the typical off spin type of delivery, in that the cricket ball is presented from the bowler's hand in such a way that once the ball pitches; instead, it deviates in the opposite direction of a leg spinning type of delivery (i.e. towards the leg stump rather than the off stump). It has also been colloquially referred to as the wrong'un, Bosie or Bosey, with the latter two eponyms referring to Bernard Bosanquet, the bowler who originally devised and began using the googly.


While a normal leg break spins from the leg to the off side, away from a right-handed batsman, a googly spins the other side, from off to leg, into a right-handed batsman (and is distinct from an off break delivery). The bowler achieves this change of spin by bending the wrist sharply from the normal leg break delivery position. When the ball rolls out of the hand (from the side near the little finger, as in a normal leg break), it emerges with clockwise spin (from the bowler's point of view). A googly may also be achieved by bowling the ball as a conventional leg break, but spinning the ball further with the fingers just before it is released.[1]


The change of wrist action can be seen by a skilled batsman and the change of spin allowed for when playing a shot at the ball.[1] Less skilled batsmen, or ones who have lost their concentration, can be deceived completely, expecting the ball to move one direction off the pitch, only for it to move the other direction. If the batsman is expecting a leg break, he will play outside the line of the ball after it spins. This means the ball can either strike the pads for a potential leg before wicket (lbw) appeal, or may fly between the bat and the pads and hit the wicket, or catch the edge of the bat.


The googly is a major weapon in the arsenal of a leg spin bowler, and can be one of the bowler's most effective most important wicket-taking balls. It is used infrequently, because its effectiveness comes mostly from its surprise value.


Left-arm unorthodox spinners can bowl with the googly action using the left arm. This delivery turns away from a right-handed batsman, like a leg break or left-arm orthodox spinner. The googly is similar in principle to the doosra, the ball from an off-spinner that turns the opposite way from his stock ball.[2]


To grip the ball for a leg-spinning delivery, the ball is placed into the palm with the seam parallel to the palm. The first two fingers then spread and grip the ball, and the third and fourth fingers close together and rest against the side of the ball. The first bend of the third finger should grasp the seam. The thumb resting against the side is up to the bowler, but should impart no pressure. When the ball is bowled, the third finger will apply most of the spin. The wrist is cocked as it comes down by the hip, and the wrist moves sharply from right to left as the ball is released, adding more spin. The ball is tossed up to provide flight. The batsman will see the back of the hand when the ball is released.[1]


An alternative grip is to hold the ball in the thumb, index finger and middle finger. The finger-print of both the thumb and index finger rest on the seam, as does the first bend of the middle finger. Together with rotation of the wrist, the index and middle fingers are involved in imparting spin on the ball and can achieve a very high number of revolutions.


Fees depend on how many teams are participating, how many players you have on your team, whether or not your team needs new uniforms or equipment, and other factors. Boise NABA is a non profit organiozation and we have one of or main priorities is to keep costs as cheap as possible while still providing a fun experience for all. Fees cover everything from field reservations, umpires, NABA league dues, baseballs, insurance, website maintenance, uniforms, and equipment. Budget around 10-12 dollars per game to be on the safe side.


Our league is fortunate to partner with local umpires to provide a better game experience than many other leagues. We often have two umpires at each of our games. We all know that balls and strikes are our favorite thing to argue, but our league demands respect of these umpires no matter the call. We have a ZERO tolerance policy for any confrontations with these umps. This does not include banter or simple argmunets, but pretty much anything past that point. They don't need to be at our games and we don't want to lose this privelage. Thank you


The Cougars (5-5 and suddenly on the cusp of being bowl eligible with FCS Utah Tech visiting in two weeks) talk a lot about playing complementary football, and for once this season, they actually did it.


BYU running back Hinckley Ropati, left, runs with the ball in front of Boise State defensive tackle Scott Matlock (99) on a 48-yard touchdown reception in the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


BYU wide receiver Puka Nacua (12) reaches for the ball over Boise State cornerback Caleb Biggers (1) for a 24-yard touchdown reception in the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


Boise State safety Rodney Robinson (4) catches the ball for an interception on a throw to BYU tight end Isaac Rex (83) in front of Boise State cornerback Jaylen Clark (41) in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


BYU defensive back Kaleb Hayes (18) knocks the ball away from Boise State wide receiver Stefan Cobbs (5) to break up a reception-attempt in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


BYU running back Lopini Katoa (4) cuts back with the ball while trying to avoid a tackle-attempt by Boise State linebacker Ty Tanner (58) in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


Boise State wide receiver Latrell Caples (7) crosses the goal line for a touchdown as BYU defensive back Talan Alfrey (25) tries to knock him out of bounds in the first half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


Boise State running back George Holani, right, dives over BYU defensive back Jakob Robinson, bottom left, into the end zone on an 11-yard touchdown run in the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


BYU quarterback Jaren Hall, front center, leans forward for a first down while dragging Boise State defenders on a fourth-down play in the second half of an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Boise, Idaho.


The Cougars dominated the first half and had nothing to show for it, thanks to a half-dozen or so incredibly costly mistakes, some by the players, some by the coaches, and one, perhaps, by the officials at the end of the half (a replay from the end zone seemed to show Katoa breaking the plane with the ball).


Triceps are a smaller muscle that may be neglected in your exercise routine. Enter Bosu dips, which will target the back of your arms. The further away your feet are from the ball, the harder this exercise will be. 59ce067264






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